Which Pageant System Is Most Suitable To You?

One of the most important factors to consider when making the decision to enter a pageant is which pageant system to compete in. Most systems are similar in the competition format they use, but pageants tend to have differing goals and expectations for and from their winners. So the first question you have to ask yourself is “which system would I be most comfortable becoming and being the winner in?” 

As is well-known, all the major beauty pageants, except Miss World, include a swimsuit round. It means that being physically fit is important. Miss Universe used to expect a lot from its contestants in this round, whereas there is evidence that in other systems you can get away with less effort. It used to be that if you were fit enough for Miss Universe, you are ready for the other contests, yet being fit enough for another competition did not mean you were Miss Universe-ready. Therefore one primordial question to consider is “how much effort am I willing to put forth in getting fit?” In pondering this question, please take into account that Miss World also has a fitness round, albeit centred on sport performance rather than physical appearance.

Closely related is the issue of being willing to compete in a swimsuit round. If you are not, then the only real option available to you is the Miss World system. Miss Universe has allowed a Muslim contestant to compete in a burkini and some national pageants, preliminary to an international contest which includes a swimsuit round, have allowed contestants to compete in the swimsuit portion in a different kind of garment, to cover their bodies. Many have applauded this move as empowering to the young women involved. We believe this just allows one individual to impose their will on the organisation and the other participants, therefore disempowering them. Each pageant’s rules are known in advance and if a contestant has any objection to any of the requirements of the contest, she should simply not compete.

Another consideration is whether the competition includes a talent round. Do you have a pageant-worthy talent or do you have time to actually fake one?

Another issue to ponder is the length of the international competition. This can vary from a few days to close to a month. The longer the contest, the more activities there will be and  the greater the amount of money you will have to invest in an appropriate wardrobe and the more it will cost you to transport all that wardrobe to the pageant’s venue. It also means you will have to take more time off work or studies. Are you willing to invest all that time and money?

Finally, you have to consider what is expected of the winner of the competition. Some pageants require you to live in their headquarter city for the duration of your reign and travel extensively. This may sound glamorous, but stop to consider whether you really are willing to put your regular life on hold for a period of time and submit your independence to an organisation.

You should enter into a pageant with open eyes, aware of all that is expected of you. If not you could be in for a rude awakening.

 

 

Effortless in 2017: Jack Eyers, Mister England 2017 & Mister World England 2018

As we stated previously, what makes a male competitor great is his charisma. He needs to project approachability, to be kind of man that men want to emulate and women (and some men) want to be with.

Charisma is not something you can learn or practice,  although you will see most male contestants try. Charisma has to be EFFORTLESS.

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One young man who you can say is the epitome of charisma is Jack Eyers, Mister England 2017. Jack is ruggedly handsome, an avid sportsman and, as they say, he “cleans up nicely”. He is a catwalk and commercial model and never puts on airs. In all his pictures he just looks like you captured some of his daily activities. Jack is indeed EFFORTLESS.

 

Jack is also smashing barriers in the world of pageants and fashion, as the first amputee to win a national title. With Jack, that is the last thing you notice though.

Jack will represent England at Mister World 2018 and we already predict he will do very well at this competition.

NOTEWORTHY: This is How You Do Pageant Photography

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Zara Nortley, Miss Galaxy England 2016

Photographer: Stacey Clarke

Make-up: Sascha Martini

 

 

NOTEWORTHY: This is How You Do Pageant Photography

Alexandra Krijger, Miss Curaçao World 2015

Photographer: Niko da Costa Gomez, www.instagram.com/nikodacostagomez

BEING PHOTOGENIC

An important tool to have when competing in pageants is a photographic portfolio, basically a model portfolio with some pageant specific shots included.

Modelling work, both catwalk and commercial, is an important part of what is expected of the modern day beauty queen. This is why pageant management and, sometimes, judges, want to see what a contestant looks like in pictures.

It is very important that the pictures actually look like you, so the viewer can recognise the person standing in from of them in these.

One fantasy or glamour shot is OK, but the images should not be edited within an inch of your life. If you end up looking like Barbie, plastic skin and all, you are in trouble. As a photographer you learn that agents and advertising execs want to be able to see pores in facial pictures (unless you really have no visible pores).

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Particularly swimsuit shots should be true to your figure, as people working the fashion industry do not like surprises. So, please stay away from photographic diets.

Important is not to only show different looks, from very casual to glam and everything in between, but also different expressions. Give evidence that you are a brilliant photographic actor.

Lastly, decide in advance if you want a colour or black+white portfolio. Having a mixed portfolio is not deemed professional. My advice though is to go with colour for your pageant portfolio.